COVID-19 Closure Update:

Peel Speech Clinic will remain closed until further notice, to help reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Our administration staff is working remotely and can be contacted at : speechclinic@davropm.com, should you require any assistance during this challenging time.

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News/Media

Below are some recent media articles. Click on any "plus" sign or title/summary to read the full article.

Nine Signs of Problems
Published in Independent and Free Press

The following 9 guidelines will help you decide if your child has a speech or language problem. If any of these apply to your child, you should arrange for a complete speech and language evaluation.

"Me want cookie" says three year old Sean. "I-I-I want a turn now." "Give give give it please" Jonathan, four years of age says excitedly. "Thoon I'll be thix" from Andrew, five years old. The parents of these children are all concerned that their child may have a speech or language problem. How can parents know what kind of speech problems are normal or what kind of speech difficulties require attention. The following nine guidelines will help you decide if your child has a speech or language problem. If any of these apply to your child, you should arrange for a speech and language evaluation.

Nine Signs of Problems

The following 9 guidelines will help you decide if your child has a speech or language problem. If any of these apply to your child, you should arrange for a complete speech and language evaluation.

  1. If by two years, your child does not speak at least 10 - 20 words with appropriate meaning or cannot follow simple commands, like "Where's your nose?"
  2. If you cannot understand your child's speech by age 3.
  3. If by age 2 1/2 your child is not producing any two-word combinations, such as "Baby happy" or is not understanding words other than simple nouns.
  4. If by age four, your child still uses sentences that are consistently very short, such as "Daddy play ball".
  5. If by age five years, people outside your family have difficulty understanding your child at times.
  6. If by age five your child still makes many 'mistakes' on pronouns or word endings such as "Them goed home".
  7. If your child stutters noticeably after age four, of if the stuttering is severe at any age.
  8. If at any age, your child's voice is consistently harsh, hoarse, too high, too low or too monotone.
  9. If your child is concerned or embarrassed by his or her speech or language at any age.

Rosemary Boyer is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Oakville Speech Clinic.

Five Ways to Help Your Toddler's Language Grow At Home
Published in Brampton Guardian

These five suggestions will help you to develop your toddlers' speech and language skills.
  1. MODEL
    Model the correct use of words by using meaningful situations at home. For example, when your child wants or needs something, label the word (e.g. cookie, juice).
  2. FOLLOW YOUR CHILD'S LEAD
    Help your child learn to listen by talking about the activity your child is involved in. If your child is playing with blocks on the floor, it's a good time to say look blocks or "big blocks".
  3. MATCH YOUR CHILD'S SPEECH "PLUS ONE"
    When your child talks, match his speech by adding "one".
    e.g. Your child: "bottle"
    You say: "Want bottle?

    Your response (i.e. match plus one) provides a phrase that is just beyond your child's language level.
  4. WHEN YOU TALK - SHORTEN YOUR REMARKS
    Remember that your phrases are models or examples for your child to learn and imitate. Keep your remarks short.
    Instead of saying: "First you'll take a bath and then I will read you a story"
    Say: "Bath first. Then story".
  5. TAKE VERBAL TURNS
    Remember to take your verbal turn.
    Your child: "juice"
    You say: "Want juice" while handing him the juice - don't give him the juice without taking your verbal turn.

Submitted by
Rosemary Boyer MCl.Sc. (Reg. CASLPO) Speech Language Pathologist

Detect Speech Difficulties Before They Cause School Problems For Your Child
Published in The Brampton Guardian

A communication problem may affect your child's success at school. The following information will assist you in knowing when to refer your school-aged child for a speech-language assessment.

A communication problem may affect your child's success at school! Did you know that the level of a child's speech/language skills entering school is one of the greatest indicators of future success?

As many as 1 in 10 school-aged children have a speech or language disorder which can affect both achievement in school and social and emotional development.

There are many types of speech and language delays/disorders present in school-age children.

Following are some helpful guidelines for parents:

  • By the time a child begins school, she/he should have mastered most speech sounds. Children by the age of 5 should be 80 to 90 percent understandable to people outside the family. If early development sounds such as k, g, t, m, n, p, b are not mastered by age 5, speech therapy is indicated.
  • School-aged children who are repeating words, parts of words or sounds should be seen by a speech-language pathologist as soon as possible.
  • The most common voice disorder in school-aged children is hoarseness. This can be caused by two hard "bumps" on the vocal cords called nodules. Vocal nodules may result from excessive shouting. Speech therapy aims to reduce this vocal abuse.
  • Children with language disorders may have difficulty understanding what is said and/or expressing their ideas in words. Children with language disabilities frequently suffer academically and socially. Other forms of language such as reading and writing are difficult for these children to learn.

Children may have one or more of the above speech-language delays/disorders.

If you suspect that your child has a speech problem, it is important to contact a speech-language pathologist as soon as possible, before the difficulties develop into more emotional, behavioral and educational problems.

Article supplied by Rosemary Boyer, speech-language pathologist

Speech therapy for children